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the story of the civil war at sea and on the rivers, jim, you were putting the finishing touches on your new book. craig, you were preparing four book for publication as well, and now both dish have to do this the way they do on the talk shows -- so, now, james mcpherson's war on the waters, the union and confederate navies, 1861 to 1865, and craig's civil war at sea, both very handsomely done, and it's good because we get to resume our conversation. we barely broke the surface. let's get right to it. because we spoke for an hour last time and we got to about january of 1862. so i'll assume you all know about 1861. and get to something that jim pointed out in his book, which i found rather interesting, and that is that 150 years ago this month, eye side from all the other things going on, including the first shudders of the realization that lincoln had actually promulgated an emancipation proclaimation. the blockade was in force in confederate ports. the union had chanced the bombardment of the city of vicksburg, and new orleans had fallen. the tennessee, cumberland, and mississippi rivers s
, breaks from the system and makes it very -- has anyone seen big jim mcclain? it's a great movie to go and cnn fact if you have time tonight, if you go to youtube and click into the box, john wayne beats up commies, you will get the final scene of big jim mcclain and you can watch it. it's truly an enjoyable moment. the storyline of big jim mcclain which comes out during this time the election is kind of heating up and by the way john wayne is a political character. is very big in reelecting mccarthy movement. he is often asked after the tend -- convention, what do you think about the ticket and mccarthy says perfectly, i think dick nixon moment to find vice president. no mention of eisenhower because he doesn't really like eisenhower and doesn't fill comfortable with eisenhower. that is the person that wayne is the biggest and supporter. dick jim mcclain comes in 1950 to come the story of a tough guy, big jim and constantly member -- mentions that his six feet three inches on many occasions. he is working for the house un-american activities committee, big jim and big jim goes out to
films. has anyone seen big jim mcclain? it's a great movie to go and see, and in fact if you have time tonight, if you go to youtube and put into the bongs, john wayne beats up come -- commies, you'll get the final scene because it's a truly enjoyable moment. what the storyline -- comes our during the time the election is heating up, and by the way, john wayne is a political character. he is very big in the re-elect mccarthy movement. he is also asked after the convention, hey, what do you think about the ticket? and mccarthy says, perfectly, i think that dick nixon will make a fine vice president. no mention of eisenhower because he doesn't like eisenhower. that's joseph mccarthy but that's the person that wayne is big nest port of. and big jim is a story of a tough guy, big jim, constantly mentioned he is 6'3" or something like that throughout the movie. he is working for the house on american activities committee. this is big jim. and big jim goes out to hawaii to break up a communist spy ring. that is mostly made up of doctors in hawaii. and in the end what he does is he finds wher
's confronted with the question by jim on the evening news and asked about the scandal and he said there is no sexual relationship. he's weak, he's vacillating and using the present tense verb. everyone gets worried at that point. then hilary once again steps in and goes on the "today" shows and says is part of a vast right-wing conspiracy. it is. but it's more than that. she stiffen his spine basically puts him in a position of outright denial and for six months he's successful and he basically buys time and the american people become more comfortable to the idea of a president who may have actually done this. when finally he has a testify before a federal grand jury, quote, unquote unappropriate relationship. hilary had to make a final decision of her life as to whether to rescue him again. he told her, yes i did have a relationship with her. and it was a terrible thing i did, and he asked for forgiveness. for the last time she saidly standby you. ly stick by you. i will not abandon you. that is pivotal. that is pivotal. it's a moment in time when a number of senators, democrat a
constant in 1921, whom jim spoke about in his introduction, and later when dorothy was the chief of the bureau in berlin was as courageous as her american trend, possibly more so spirits intent on breaking through that concrete ceiling of male dominated the literature and journalism they both were intent on confronting the pivotal issues of their time head-on, and they would remain friends of their lives. it was as humble as a beginning as dorothy. she was born sicily isabel on the a outskirts of london in 18922 space thailand mother with musical aspirations in a truly gifted journalist father when she abandoned them to poverty. she was both devastated and in the liberated. as angry as she was, she liked thompson was able to convince herself. naughty and rebellious ms. fairfield first tried to be an actress which was a terrible thing for a respectable woman to do but early on, she realized that her true passion and the devotee was the spoken word coming and she became a feminist journalist as a tool for initiating social change. by the age of 20, she had earned a reputation as a
it successfully with pat moynihan in new york. he ran against william buckley's brother jim. at the first debate, buckley turned to him and starts bashing comes right out of the court with moynihan. he looks up and says, oh, the mudslinging begins. [laughter] >> thank you. tell us and generalize for us, historians have not typically have access to anything resembling this kind of material with the exception of nixon and whatever. how were we to regard the source of information? what is it? you have to check it? is a good way to his? >> i think it is good to go. what is wonderful about these tapes is the immediacy of them. also, we do have other presidential tapes to listen to. one of the things that i actually love about these tapes of the conversations between president kennedy and his brother. when you listen to the nixon tapes, they have a certain quality. then you listen to the two kennedy brothers talking about how mean this guy is. it sounds so quaint as opposed to some of what we heard on the nixon tapes. i'm sure that there were other words used to describe problematic figures. but it r
that actually it's encouraging the active reading. >> i am going to come back to you jim. i just want to stop another publisher here, agent of sort. so you don't care whether it's in the book or or in digits? >> i think as long as people rated it doesn't matter. the generational shift points to -- >> what about the beauty of the book? >> i love books. i don't know that the next generation will have the same experience that i grew up with in terms of the tactile experience, the physical experience. and is a professional who is concerned with getting work out, i don't care as long as they are having that solitary experience with the work of a writer. it breaks my heart. i mean i think the container is beautiful. i love to look at the book, not sure she is here. i love to look at the decisions the publisher has made with the writer about whether a book is going to have embossing, whether it's going to have ragged edges. i love to watch people in bookstores touch books and have that tester looks very and but i think ultimately what we get is something so deep and personal about this kind of one-o
. [laughter] mia and of ballpark? jim solar merkle whole thing that she misunderstood said i believe the future of the year will dominate our discussions in the coming days. the city that has more herb bridges in any other in the world as pittsburgh. >> congratulations to pittsburg she asked? president romney thought. no. just congratulations. the prime minister of canada it joined a group and introduced himself. are you a french canadian origin? know i am not. but i am canadian the state stone said are you a french canadian origin to the guy next to him. know i am david cameron. he looked at harper then cameron that and he said brothers? cousins? uncle? no. at that point* they were joined by the prime minister of japan him and president romney were introduced. are you about 55 or 60? and my clothes? and 56 years of age said the prime minister formally. your name sounds french canadian. [laughter] with i don't suppose you are of french canadian origin? >> no i am not. >> congratulations. [laughter] hitting a grand slam home run in 1950 not until 2008 had another jewish pitcher hit an
who know him, he's a very strong-willed man, and he went out in a car with jim gallager, personally introduced the men, not men who came in through other means like eddy who came in through an athletic scholarship. can everybody hear me? probably better. sat in a coffee shop one night and decided who would get in, the two of them, and presented a bill to father sward, the president at the time, it was $80,000, and a college with a million dollars in endowment at the time was quite a cost to bear so -- what he was looking for, i asked, you know, how do you decide? anybody's who is a parent in the room knows that intelligence is not necessarily something that is a hallmark of success. it doesn't necessarily lead to success, and when you talk to father brooks, he was looking for leadership qualities. he was looking for drive. he was looking for people who had a work ethic, people who were hoping to reach beyond their black and white, and if you may or may not know, he was fighting at the time to get women into the college. sadly, for the class of 1972, i don't think they arrived until
ellie and i happened to hail from position, the council of foreign relations that whittaker jim snow that would've seen at a hotbed of pinko commie sense but nevertheless the world changes. when i think of tonight, but i think about it is, when i think of it i think not just of the fact that it is a document of great little repower, which, of course, it is and is part of its appeal, but also the fact that it was this very potent weapon in this ideological battle against communism. that was raging when it came after it was not a weapon that was designed, funded or created by the u.s. government but nevertheless it became a very powerful instrument of warfare against the appeal of communism. and i'm sure and not deleted millions of people in the united states and no doubt around the world to the appeal of communism and revealed its true face, which the communist hierarchy did so much to keep hidden. there was of course a much larger war, ideological work on what i think more accurately can be called political war being waged by the u.s. government and by a lot of individuals, including
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10

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